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Can my spouse get social security disability benefits?

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Can my spouse get social security disability benefits?

If you feel you are eligible for social security disability benefits, you should apply for them online as soon as possible. Social security disability payments can alleviate financial stress you encounter if you are unable to work due to your disability. 

If you feel this applies to you, you can find the online application for social security disability here

If you have made an application for social security disability benefits previously and it has been denied, you should consider hiring a social security attorney to help appeal the decision.

In this post you will find all you need to know about applying for disability benefits, who is eligible and the amount you can receive.

Who is eligible for social security disability?

If you are unsure if you could be eligible for social security disability, this depends on many factors. These factors include:

  • Your ability to work. If you are able to work at least part time and earn over $1,310 per year, it is unlikely that you will be considered disabled.
  • How long you have worked for in the past. If you have paid much social security over the years of your life, you are more likely to be accepted in your claim.
  • The type of disability you have. If your disability disqualifies you from working at all, it is more likely that you can claim social security disability. If you are able to work some jobs, but not all, this will reduce your chances.
  • Your spouse. If your spouse is also disabled, you will be eligible for a larger sum each month than if your spouse is able to work, or if you live alone. 

How much do my spouse and I get for social security disability?

If you and your spouse are both eligible for social security disability, you are entitled to a maximum of around $2000 per month, depending on your age. The older you are, the higher the amount will be, because it will mean you have paid more social security over your lifetime. 

If you are disabled and your spouse is not, you can be “deemed” a portion of their income to you. If your spouse’s income is high, this might make you ineligible for SSDI or SSI. 

The amount of social security benefit you receive entirely depends on the type of disability you have and the type of benefits you are applying for, as well as your household income.

Will my spouse’s income affect my social security benefit claim?

Your spouse’s (meaning someone to whom you are legally married and currently living with) income only affects your application if you are applying for low-income SSI or SSDI, which is given out on a case-by-case basis.

However, if you are applying for social security after retirement, your spouse’s income shouldn’t affect your application.

Your eligibility for social security disability benefits and other social security insurance rests on many factors including your medical history, age and marital status. If you aren’t sure whether you are eligible, the only way to find out is to make an application. 

If you feel this applies to you, you can find the online application for social security disability here

If you have made an application for social security disability benefits previously and it has been denied, you should consider hiring a social security attorney to help appeal the decision.

In this post you will find all you need to know about applying for disability benefits, who is eligible and the amount you can receive.

Who is eligible for social security disability?

If you are unsure if you could be eligible for social security disability, this depends on many factors. These factors include:

  • Your ability to work. If you are able to work at least part time and earn over $1,310 per year, it is unlikely that you will be considered disabled.
  • How long you have worked for in the past. If you have paid much social security over the years of your life, you are more likely to be accepted in your claim.
  • The type of disability you have. If your disability disqualifies you from working at all, it is more likely that you can claim social security disability. If you are able to work some jobs, but not all, this will reduce your chances.
  • Your spouse. If your spouse is also disabled, you will be eligible for a larger sum each month than if your spouse is able to work, or if you live alone. 

How much do my spouse and I get for social security disability?

If you and your spouse are both eligible for social security disability, you are entitled to a maximum of around $2000 per month, depending on your age. The older you are, the higher the amount will be, because it will mean you have paid more social security over your lifetime. 

If you are disabled and your spouse is not, you can be “deemed” a portion of their income to you. If your spouse’s income is high, this might make you ineligible for SSDI or SSI. 

The amount of social security benefit you receive entirely depends on the type of disability you have and the type of benefits you are applying for, as well as your household income.

Will my spouse’s income affect my social security benefit claim?

Your spouse’s (meaning someone to whom you are legally married and currently living with) income only affects your application if you are applying for low-income SSI or SSDI, which is given out on a case-by-case basis.

However, if you are applying for social security after retirement, your spouse’s income shouldn’t affect your application.

Your eligibility for social security disability benefits and other social security insurance rests on many factors including your medical history, age and marital status. If you aren’t sure whether you are eligible, the only way to find out is to make an application.